Tag Archives: Novant Health Thomasville Medical Center

3D-mammogram-screenings

“It helps us pick up small cancers” Do I need a 3-D mammogram? What you need to know.

by Arnold Koriakin, DO

3-D mammograms have been shown to detect more cancer cases than the standard mammogram, according to a study reported in the Journal of the American Medical Association*.

3D-mammogram-screeningsThis fall, Novant Health Thomasville Medical Center began offering 3-D mammography to patients in the surrounding communities. With the addition of these facilities, Novant Health now has 12 locations offering this new technology

Dr. Arnold Koriakin, a radiologist with Triad Radiology and medical director of mammography services at Novant Health Thomasville Medical Center, provided insight about how 3-D mammography works.

What’s different?

The 3-D mammography technology allows a woman’s breast to be imaged from multiple angles. The angled images provide 1-millimeter-thin snapshots of the breast tissue that, collectively, provide radiologists a more detailed, three-dimensional view than standard two-dimensional mammograms.

Koriakin said the new technology allows providers to have better visibility and more accurately detect cases of breast cancer.

“In the past, a standard image would be two images of each breast,” Koriakin said. “With the 3-D mammogram, the procedure is the same, but the camera rotates and takes multiple photos so we get a seamless view of the breast.”

3d-digital-mammographyKoriakin said this technology allows radiologists to look through the breast and uncover little masses or areas of distortion.

“It helps us pick up small cancers that we otherwise would have missed,” he said. “It also reduces call backs and anxiety for patients.”

What to expect.

Most women wouldn’t notice much difference between a 3-D mammogram and a standard digital mammogram. “The examination itself is almost identical for patients,” Koriakin said. “It just takes about four seconds longer per view.”

During a 3-D mammogram, an X-ray tube moves in an arc over the patient and takes multiple low-dose images that are regenerated by a computer. After 3-D imaging is complete, the machine will move back to the center and take the regular two-dimensional, or standard, mammogram pictures.

Why you might need one.

Women who would most greatly benefit from tomosynthesis or 3-D mammography are those with dense breasts and those who have an increased risk of breast cancer.

Contrary to popular belief, what constitutes “dense breasts” has nothing to do with breast size. Breast tissue is made of both fatty tissue and glandular tissue, the latter of which causes the density.

“When you have dense breast tissue, it can be difficult to see little masses or things hiding within the dense tissue,” Koriakin said. “3-D mammography allows us to look through the entire breast and detect more cases of cancer.”

Visit NovantHealth.org/gopink to schedule your mammogram appointment. Same-day and walk-in appointments are available. If you think 3-D mammography is appropriate for you, simply request it when you call. Depending on your insurance plan, additional fees may apply.

 

*Friedewald SM, Rafferty EA, Rose SL, Durand MA, Plecha DM, Greenberg JS, Hayes MK, Copit DS, Carlson KL, Cink TM, Barke LD, Greer LN, Miller DP, Conant EF. Breast Cancer Screening Using Tomosynthesis in Combination With Digital Mammography. JAMA. 2014;311(24):2499–2507. doi:10.1001/jama.2014.6095

 

 

water

I’ll Have Water, Please!

Why you should drink more water

By Caitlyn Madore

With warmer weather on its way, take this opportunity to make sure you’re staying properly hydrated. Chances are you aren’t drinking enough water throughout the day – one of the most essential nutrients for life.

Women should drink about 72 ounces of fluids a day, and men should drink about 100 ounces a day, according to the Institute of Medicine. That’s about 9 cups and 12.5 cups, respectively. While those estimates account for water and other fluids, it’s always better to choose water over sugary drinks, soda, and juices.

Why is that? Water refreshes and reinvigorates in ways that no other liquid can. “Water impacts your body’s health as a whole in many different ways,” said registered dietitian, Caitlyn Madore. “It regulates our body temperature, carries nutrients, lubricates our joints, and protects our organs. If you aren’t drinking enough, it’s harder for your body to carry out these essential tasks.”

Water and weight

Drinking enough water can also promote overall health, including weight management.

“Sometimes thirst can be mistaken as hunger,” Madore shares. “This can lead to possible weight gain when excess calories are consumed due to what your body perceives as hunger. If you’re drinking enough water, your body won’t have to determine if you’re hungry or if you’re actually just thirsty.”

Madore says drinking water with meals could also promote an earlier feeling of fullness. If you drink a glass of water before you start your meal, you will be more likely to stick to the recommended portions.

Choosing water over soda and other sweetened beverages can also cut your calories for the day.

Dehydration

Dehydration, or not consuming enough water, can negatively affect your health. Not staying hydrated can impair our ability to achieve optimal health, including the health of our skin. Dehydration could result in skin that is dry and more prone to wrinkling. Madore added that dehydration can also cause confusion, loss of energy, weakness, and can prevent our bodies from working at their best to fight ailments.

Tips to drink more water

If you find yourself struggling to reach for more water, here are some easy tips:

  • Add your own flavor with fruit slices! Fruit slices are a natural way to add flavor to your water without adding unnecessary sugar. Try adding slices of lemon, lime, or oranges.
  • Keep a glass or bottle of water nearby at your desk or in your car. You will be more likely to drink it if you are surrounded by it throughout the day.
  • Think of the money you could save. It’s cheaper and better for you to order water at restaurants. Both your wallet and your body will thank you.

 

Caitlyn Madore is a registered dietitian and licensed dietary nutritionist at Novant Health Thomasville Medical Center.

 

fats

What’s Up With Fat?

By Sarah Larocco, MSN, FNP-C

The American Heart Association says a body definitely needs some fat. Dietary fats keep the machine that is the body humming by creating energy, protecting organs, stimulating cell growth, producing needed hormones, and helping the body absorb key nutrients.

“The average American diet is already heavy in fat,” says Sarah Larocco, MSN, FNP-C with Novant Health Chair City Family Medicine. “Our food choices also greatly impact cholesterol levels.”

The so-called “good fats” are monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, while “bad fats” are trans-fat and saturated fats. The bad fats are responsible for raising the bad type of cholesterol in the body, which is called low density lipoprotein (LDL). This type of cholesterol can increase the risk for atherosclerosis, which is plaque build-up in the blood vessels that limits blood flow. Good fats can lower the levels of LDL, reducing your risk of atherosclerosis and therefore reducing the risk for heart attack and stroke.

According to the AHA, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats (“good fats”) provide Vitamin E to our diet, an antioxidant that most Americans need more of. Polyunsaturated fats also provide omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, which the body needs but can’t produce on its own.

Examples of monounsaturated fats include olive, canola, sunflower, peanut, and sesame oils. They are also found in olives, avocados, peanut butter, almonds, macadamia nuts, and cashews.

Examples of polyunsaturated fats are found in soybean oil, corn oil, and fatty fish like salmon, trout, or tuna. Walnuts, flaxseed, soybeans, tofu, and sunflower and pumpkin seeds are other good sources of this fat.

Saturated fat (“bad fat”) is naturally occurring and is found in high-fat cuts of meat and chicken with skin on it. It’s also in non-skim dairy products like milk, cream, and yogurt, as well as in ice cream, cheese, and butter. Limit meals with animal products to once a day. Try replacing red meat with beans, nuts, poultry, and fish whenever possible, and switching from whole milk and other full-fat dairy foods to lower fat versions.

Most of the trans-fat we consume is partially hydrogenated oils in processed food. These are also “bad fats” and are used by food manufacturers to improve texture, flavor, and shelf life of food. It can be found in commercially-baked cookies and cakes or snack food such as chips and crackers, margarine, and fried fast food. Other foods high in trans-fat are frozen pizza, candy bars, and hydrogenated cooking oils. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention urge people to keep trans-fat to a minimum as it contributes to an increase in LDL or “bad cholesterol.”

The AHA recommends that adults would benefit from lowering LDL cholesterol by reducing their intake of trans-fat and limiting consumption of saturated fat to 5 to 6% of total calories. “Moderation is the key word,” says Larocco. “For example, if a label for cookies says 0.5 grams of trans-fat per serving (serving size 2 cookies) and you eat 10 cookies, the amount of trans-fat adds up fast.” Larocco recommends reading the complete list of ingredients and staying away from products with partially hydrogenated oil and added sugars.

“Our busy schedules today lead many of us to reach for fast food or simple food options which are pre-made; however, we need to limit consumption of foods that come in boxes, bags, packages, or from the fryer,” says Larocco. Check the number of ingredients listed on a product. In general if a label contains more than five ingredients, leave that item behind and go to the fresh fruit and vegetable section. Your heart and body will thank you!