water

I’ll Have Water, Please!

Why you should drink more water

By Caitlyn Madore

With warmer weather on its way, take this opportunity to make sure you’re staying properly hydrated. Chances are you aren’t drinking enough water throughout the day – one of the most essential nutrients for life.

Women should drink about 72 ounces of fluids a day, and men should drink about 100 ounces a day, according to the Institute of Medicine. That’s about 9 cups and 12.5 cups, respectively. While those estimates account for water and other fluids, it’s always better to choose water over sugary drinks, soda, and juices.

Why is that? Water refreshes and reinvigorates in ways that no other liquid can. “Water impacts your body’s health as a whole in many different ways,” said registered dietitian, Caitlyn Madore. “It regulates our body temperature, carries nutrients, lubricates our joints, and protects our organs. If you aren’t drinking enough, it’s harder for your body to carry out these essential tasks.”

Water and weight

Drinking enough water can also promote overall health, including weight management.

“Sometimes thirst can be mistaken as hunger,” Madore shares. “This can lead to possible weight gain when excess calories are consumed due to what your body perceives as hunger. If you’re drinking enough water, your body won’t have to determine if you’re hungry or if you’re actually just thirsty.”

Madore says drinking water with meals could also promote an earlier feeling of fullness. If you drink a glass of water before you start your meal, you will be more likely to stick to the recommended portions.

Choosing water over soda and other sweetened beverages can also cut your calories for the day.

Dehydration

Dehydration, or not consuming enough water, can negatively affect your health. Not staying hydrated can impair our ability to achieve optimal health, including the health of our skin. Dehydration could result in skin that is dry and more prone to wrinkling. Madore added that dehydration can also cause confusion, loss of energy, weakness, and can prevent our bodies from working at their best to fight ailments.

Tips to drink more water

If you find yourself struggling to reach for more water, here are some easy tips:

  • Add your own flavor with fruit slices! Fruit slices are a natural way to add flavor to your water without adding unnecessary sugar. Try adding slices of lemon, lime, or oranges.
  • Keep a glass or bottle of water nearby at your desk or in your car. You will be more likely to drink it if you are surrounded by it throughout the day.
  • Think of the money you could save. It’s cheaper and better for you to order water at restaurants. Both your wallet and your body will thank you.

 

Caitlyn Madore is a registered dietitian and licensed dietary nutritionist at Novant Health Thomasville Medical Center.

 

MarchCoverImage

When History Is Revived

By Stacy Hilton Vanzant

It’s not unusual for Focus Magazine to find local historical imagery connected to articles we cover in the magazine. More often than not those images are lacking names, locations, or other information that we can share with our readers. A few years ago we did an article on the Mills Home in Thomasville. Many of you may recall the article and the cover photo was of three young boys eating watermelon. At the time the article was published we didn’t know the context of the picture, who the children were, or even when the photo was captured. After a month or so of the magazine’s being available to our readers, we were able to identify the boys’ names and information about the photo from call-ins and letters. It was amazing to find the names of three orphan boys taken more than 30 years prior to being featured on a Focus magazine cover.

The most recent issue on Coble Dairy published in March 2017 proved to be no different. We found this lovely photo of a young girl picking up cartons of milk from a front porch. As an editor, the photo took my breath away when I found it in a stack of photos at Jerry Smith’s house and his Coble Dairy collection. When I saw the picture I knew it had to be our cover photo. Jerry had no information on the image. For that matter, he wasn’t even sure the photo was taken locally. I recall saying to Jerry, “Ya know, it wouldn’t be the first time that we’ve identified someone with the magazine. If this is a local photo, I can about bet that we will find out who it is.” Jerry looked at me with an inquisitive gaze and I reassured him again, “It is very possible.”

KathyMargieEverhartThree days after the magazine hit the streets of Davidson County and the cover image was uploaded on the Facebook page, we found her! Sure enough, local lifetime resident Kathy Everhart was the unknown little girl on the cover. Kathy’s daughter, Leigh Strickland, posted on our Facebook page that it was her mother. I was ecstatic! In three days we were able to identify the image and all the stories that go along with it. Once I connected with Kathy she was bursting at the seams with excitement. She could not believe that her picture was on the cover of our magazine. Not only was it her picture, but a photo of her that she didn’t have a copy of.

Kathy, an avid reader of Focus Magazine, picked up a copy a day or so before and put it in her car. “I always look for a copy and get one for myself and my mom, Margie Everhart,” recounted Kathy. “That day I just set it aside in the car and forgot about it. A day later I picked it up and yelled, ‘That’s me!’”

That’s right. In the early 1950s when Kathy was a little girl around the age of three, her mother was asked if some photos could be taken of Kathy for an advertisement brochure for Coble Dairy. Kathy’s mother, Margie, worked for Coble Dairy as a receptionist, and the higher ups at the company thought Kathy would be perfect for the shot.

“When I saw this photo I asked my Mom if she did my hair like that or did they pay someone,” said Kathy. “My mom kind of chuckled and said, ‘Oh, of course I did your hair like that.’”

Kathy’s father, who is currently in his early 90s, was at home the day she brought the photos to show her mom. “Daddy, do you see the little girl in this picture? Do you know her?” she said to him. “Why of course honey, that’s you!” he exclaimed. When we found the image in the stack of pictures it was black and white. With the help of our designer we added a little white washed color over the image to give the robe a little hue of pink and make the bear a slightly watered down brown. Funny enough, Kathy was excited to share that the robe she was wearing that day was a light shade of pink and that the bear was actually brown.

It has been a fun experience showing up in Focus Magazine according to Kathy. To her and her family it has brought back a many pleasant memories that they’ve been able to share. Since the article, Kathy and Jerry Smith have connected and now Kathy has copies of the cover image and another one taken that day to have for her own.

The Everharts weren’t the only images identified as a result of that issue. We have received additional information on a photo taken by H.L. Waters from the Davidson County Historical Museum of the boys milking cows. These boys were orphans from the Junior Order Home and they milked cows for Coble Dairy. They milked 25 cows per day, but based on the stories from those who identified the boys, they often drank more milk than what they took back to the dairy.

These are just many of the fun stories we can share that happen after Focus magazine goes to press. We hope you have enjoyed a follow-up to history!